Conjunction

Definition: Conjunctions are the words we use to link or join two or more sentences together or two words within the same sentence. The most common conjunctions in English are: and, but, or, nor, for.

  • For example: We eat at home and work in the office (The conjunction "and" joins the sentences: "we eat at home" with "we work in the office").

There are two kinds of conjunctions

  • Coordinating.
  • Subordinating.

Coordinating Coordinating conjunctions are used when we want to join two sentences that work at the same level of importance in our speech, both actions are equally important. These conjunctions are:

And
Now
But
Still
So
Only
Therefore
Moreover
Besides
Consequently
Nevertheless
For
However
Hence
Either...or...
Neither... nor...
Both... and
Not only... but also
While
Then
So then

For expample:

  • They went to the beach and had lunch there

  • In this example we are using the coordinating conjunction "and" to join two different sentences, "They went to the beach" with "(they) had lunch there".

Subordinating Subordinating conjunctions are used to join two sentences when one of them is depending on the first one. The majority of conjunctions are "subordinating conjunctions". They are:

Who
Wich
That
Although, though
While
Since
Until
As
As if, as though
After
Before
How
Once
So that
When
Lest
Why
If
In order that
Unless
Whether... or
Because of
Till
Where
Whether

A subordinate or dependent clause "depends" on a main or independent clause. It cannot exist alone. For example: "Although I work hard" does not make any sense. But a main or independent clause can exist alone. For example: "I'm still broke."

For expample:

  • This is the restaurant that I told you about

  • In this example, the subordinating conjunction "that" introduces the sentence "I told you about" which is dependent on the first sentence "this is the restaurant".

Position:

  • Coordinating conjunctions always come between the words or clauses that they join.
  • Subordinating conjunctions usually come at the beginning of the subordinate clause.



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