Demonstrative pronoun

Definition: Demonstrative pronouns are pronouns that point to specific things. "This, that, these, those, none and neither" are Demonstrative Pronouns that substitute nouns when the nouns they replace can be understood from the context. At the same time, to indicate whether they are close or far, in space or time, from the speaker in the moment of speaking. They also indicate whether they are replacing singular or plural words. Some grammars describe them as members of the class of function words called "determiners", since they identify nouns and other nominals.

  • "This" (singular) and "These" (plural) refer to an object or person NEAR the speaker.
  • "That" (singular) and "Those" (plural) refer to an object or person further AWAY.

For example:

  • This is unbelievable.
    * In this example, "this" can refer to an object or situation close in space or in time to the speaker.
  • That is unbelievable.
    * In this example, "that" can refer to an object or situation farther in space or in time to the speaker.
  • These are unbelievable.
    * In this example, "these" can refer to some objects close in space or in time to the speaker.
  • Those are unbelievable.
    * In this example, "those" can refer to some objects farther in space or in time to the speaker.

Position

  • Before the noun.
  • Before the word 'one'.
  • Before an adjective + noun.
  • Alone when the noun is 'understood'

Examples

  • Who owns that house? (distant - physical )
  • Is this John's house? (near - physical )
  • That's nothing to do with me.. (distant - psychological )
  • This is a nice surprise! (near - psychological )



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